Information Governance Reference Model (IGRM)

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The mission of the Information Governance Reference Model (IGRM) Project is to provide a common, practical, flexible framework to help organizations develop and implement effective and actionable information management programs.

The IGRM Project aims to offer guidance to Legal, IT, Records Management, line-of-business leaders and other business stakeholders within organizations. The Project seeks to facilitate dialogue among these stakeholders by providing a common language and reference for discussion and decision-making based on the needs of the organization.




Relationship to EDRM Framework

The IGRM is an entirely new reference model; a separate counterpart to EDRM.

The IGRM Project does NOT aim to solely build out the Information Management node of the EDRM framework. It will be extensible in numerous directions, such as records management, compliance, and IT infrastructure.

The IGRM will stand alone but will not be isolated. It will have conceptual correlations to IM-related activities/processes, such as RM, compliance, ECM, e-discovery, etc.

Filling a Need

There is a genuine need for a general-purpose, broadly applicable reference framework for the industry at large (end users, vendors, influencers, and other market players). No such model currently exists. While there are many IM-related frameworks, they typically deal with RM/structured information, or are organization-specific, not “generic” or broadly applicable across multiple industries, functions, etc.

A Communications Tool

The IGRM will help bridge gap between IT, Legal, Compliance, RM, and other stakeholder groups within organizations. The IGRM does NOT aim to produce a model that is prescriptive in nature; rather, it seeks to provide a reference that will promote cross-functional dialogue and collaboration.

Additional Resources

Information Governance Reference Model (IGRM)
Using the IGRM Model
Information Governance Reference Model (IGRM) Guide
Disposing of Digital Debris
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24 comments to Information Governance Reference Model (IGRM)

  • “Fundamentally, information governance is a business process. In order to lower risks and achieve greater efficiencies through process improvement, electronic discovery will increasingly become tightly integrated with an organization’s information governance policy, procedures, and infrastructure.”

    How the Information Governance Reference Model (IGRM) Complements ARMA International’s Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles

    This ABA article describes how an organization’s team of in-house attorneys, lead outside counsel, RIM, and IT professionals can be instrumental in guiding discussions with business management to achieve better eDiscovery by implementing a unified Information Governance program.

    Better E-Discovery: Unified Governance and the IGRM
    American Bar Association, Section of Litigation, Technology for the Litigator, June 11, 2012
    Co-Authors: Marcus Ledergerber and Matthew Knouff



  • “Fundamentally, information governance is a business process. In order to lower risks and achieve greater efficiencies through process improvement, electronic discovery will increasingly become tightly integrated with an organization’s information governance policy, procedures, and infrastructure.”

    How the Information Governance Reference Model (IGRM) Complements ARMA International’s Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles

    This ABA article describes how an organization’s team of in-house attorneys, lead outside counsel, RIM, and IT professionals can be instrumental in guiding discussions with business management to achieve better eDiscovery by implementing a unified Information Governance program.

    Better E-Discovery: Unified Governance and the IGRM
    American Bar Association, Section of Litigation, Technology for the Litigator, June 11, 2012
    Co-Authors: Marcus Ledergerber and Matthew Knouff



  • Guido Rosales

    how it differs IGRM for example from a ISMS or the management of the information with COBIT and IT Governance / SI. Eventually the ISMS as Cobit both have all the elements of this new model. We would not be including some who already have businesses and instead of trying to change it improve? The problem is that many years is management of information and this model (cobit or isms) does not have anything else aparante to justify its study and implementation.

  • blipner

    A model which expands the conversation from “litigation preparedness” to “information preparedness (governance)” is truly needed in this day of multiple repositories (DMS / Sharepoint / fileshares / MS Exchange / GMAIL /), multiple processes (collaboration / knowledge management / records management / line-of-business systems) and multiple risks (compliance / eDiscovery ).

    The need to look at your entire information domain in a systematic and rational way is upon us. Perhaps the IGRM will provide a structure within which organizations can master their information domain.

    Three cheers for IGRM.

  • Jacques Francoeur

    The addition of an information management dimension upstream of the EDRM is critical to solving the cost and complexity aspects of legal discovery. There are a number of things one can do during the information life cycle that can impact negatively the discovery process, such as encryption. Alternatively, there are a number of things one can do to improve the discovery process related to preservation and authentication of information, such as digital signatures and rights management. I have authored a thought leadership (no selling, no product pitch) white paper on the topic entitled “The Evolving Landscape of Legal Discovery and the Emerging Role of the CISO.” The objective was to allow Security and Legal professionals to understand how they both interrelate within the context of legal discovery. If you are interested, please email me at francoeurj@saic.com.

  • Stephen Wade

    Very Confusing! Just clicked on the Information Management box in the EDRM reference Model expecting to find a description of how this activity relates to the remainder of the model. Instead I see an “advertisement” for a new Reference Model that is attempting to recreate very well established information and records management practices. When I look to the participants I note the majority are vendors. This leaves me to begin to question the remainder of the model which to date has proven a pretty good reference. Stick with what you know and do not attmept to recreate the wheel.

    • Stephen:

      As outside counsel, it is my job to hire vendors. Vendor advertising is a bane of my existence. I avoid it at all costs.

      I recently joined EDRM. It required minimal effort, and I was offered the chance to meaningfully participate in less than 24 hours. I have no reason to believe that you, or any other non-vendor, would encounter anything different. I have encountered no vendor advertising. In fact, I have been pleasantly surprised at how well these competitors cooperate and how infrequent they reference their own companies.

      In short, your guilt-by-association questioning of the entire model is not well founded, especially given your admission that you have found it useful. Further, you can answer your own question by participating.

      To the extent you have substantive objections to IMRM, there is a valid conversation to be had. But your comment went far beyond that.

      Casey

  • Christian Liipfert

    Interesting development re the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. Proposed amendments that specifically reference the obligation to make employees aware of a company’s document retention policy.

    This is going to generate some work.

    Go here and search for “document” to get the two amendments.

  • Peterk

    I wonder how many records management professionals if any were involved in the development of this model? I seem to recall seeing a large number of vendors participating

  • I agree with Julie. If anything, what’s referenced here is nice picture for attorneys to use in their pitch decks for e-discovery services. This is more of the EDRM tail wagging the dog. For purposes most valuable to large and small enterprises, it’s best to ground information management reference models in a set of core principles about enterprise information and records. GARP is a convenient place to start.

  • I’m wondering how/if ARMA’s GARP (Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles) and its associated maturity model will be leveraged in this effort. It appears to me that the intent of this group is to develop a GARP-like model, and I’m just not sure of the value of creating another one. Why not leverage what already exists?

    Plus, I would contend that how Information Management is depicted in the EDRM Model is misleading. Information Management is pervasive and non-stop. It doesn’t start when litigation ensues or is reasonably expected; it happens without regard to litigation at all (or at least it should). In my opinion, Information Management shouldn’t be depicted as a “step”, rather as an overarching activity and guiding principle to the eD process.

    Anyway, just some thoughts. Would love to see some of this addressed somewhere.

    Julie

    • Farawayteacher

      Excuse me but, in my view, you don’t understand. This isn’t a record keeping model, in no way. This is much more wide and comprehensive. Anyway, what does it mean that Information Management is a ‘step’ rather as an overarching activity, if you think isn’t related to E-Discovery?
      I’m not English speaker, so sorry about that. I’m only trying to think well, and you give me confusion for free.

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