Relational Database

Definition(s)

  • A relational database is a collection of data items organized as a set of formally-described tables from which data can be accessed or reassembled in many different ways without having to reorganize the database tables. Invented by E. F. Codd at IBM in 1970.  1
  • A database in which some items in one type of record refer to items in another type of record. Relational databases generally link together two or more tables or files from different databases through a common field or within ranges, thus allowing searches of multiple fields, such as dates.  2
  • A database containing records in fields that are somehow connected or “related.” This allows simultaneous searches of multiple fields.  3
  • A style of data storage and access where the data are stored in tables. Each row contains one record, and each column contains one variable for that record. Relational databases also allow references (relations) between tables. SQL, structured query language is the typical method used to access the information in relational databases.  4

Notes

  1. Fenwick & West LLP, FWPS eDiscovery Terminology (11/6/2005). Citing SearchDatabase.com, http://searchoracle.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid41_gci212885,00.html.
  2. Legal Electronic Document Institute, Basic Principles of Automated Litigation Support (2005).
  3. Legal Electronic Document Institute, Basic Principles of Automated Litigation Support (2005).
  4. Herb Roitblat, Search 2020: The Glossary.